Museum closed until April

The Allegany Museum will be closed for several months from January 1 until April 2016.

The grand old building, now the location of the Allegany Museum, was built in 1929. It is in the Federal ‘neo-classic’ style, and featured marble floors and a grand atrium on the first floor. These beautiful features will be uncovered and restored during renovation work that will start early in the new year.

The first floor will have exhibition areas for previously unseen collections of artifacts from Allegany County history. The existing exhibits on the second floor will also be revamped.

We are excited about the great development for the Museum and for Allegany County!

post office card

Postcard featuring the Allegany Museum in its days as a Federal building.

Whiskey Rebellion Commemoration June 2016

IF YOU LIKE YOUR HISTORY SERVED WITH A TWIST – JOIN THE REBELLION

Weekend of Boutique Whiskeys, craft beer, high-end cigars, and George Washington

The only time a sitting President lead troops into the field was when President Washington rode to Western Maryland and Pennsylvania to put down the Whiskey Rebellion.  The sortie began at Fort Cumberland. To commemorate this event and other local history, Allegany Museum in Cumberland is hosting a Whiskey Rebellion Celebration in June 2016.

The event will open Friday evening, June 10, 6:00 pm with a Whiskey Rebellion Fest, featuring tastings from eight distillers, including Maker’s Mark.  Tickets to the Bash are $50 ($75 at the door), which includes tastings, a souvenir shot glass, one drink at the cash bar, tavern games, photo with ‘President Washington’, canapés, and music by Grand Ole Ditch.  Guests will have access to a presentation of cigar/whiskey pairings.

On Saturday, the Rebellion Beer Garden will serve craft brews from noon to 5:pm. Guests will also have the opportunity to win museum quality brewing collectibles. Admission to Saturday’s Beer Garden is free. The US Army Drum and Fife Corps will provide musical entertainment.

Actors portraying the young Washington as commander of troops and reenactments of other scenes from our colonial history presented by the Embassy Theatre, will pop up at all locations, and there will be chances to interact with amusements popular in mid-18th century colonial Maryland.

As well, the hundreds of attractions at the nearby Heritage Days walk will provide food, crafts, and entertainment, with attractions for the kids.  And, if that is not enough, visitors will also be able to stroll amongst the artists competing in downtown Cumberland in the annual Allegany Arts Council Plein Air competition.

It’s a big weekend. Book your accommodation and your tickets to the Friday evening Fest now.

Allegany Museum

3 Pershing Street Cumberland, MD 21502

(301) 777-7200

www.AlleganyMuseum.org

The Whiskey Rebellion Harrisburg, Pennsylvania -- October 3, 1794 In September 1791 the western counties of Pennsylvania broke out in rebellion against a federal excise tax on the distillation of whiskey. After local and federal officials were attacked, President Washington and his advisors decided to send troops to pacify the region. It was further decided that militia troops, rather than regulars, would be sent. On August 14, 1792, under the provisions of the newly-enacted militia law, Secretary of War Henry Knox called upon the governors of Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania for 12,950 troops as a test of the President's power to enforce the law. Numerous problems, both political and logistical, had to be overcome and by October, 1794 the militiamen were on the march. The New Jersey units marched from Trenton to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. There they were reviewed by their Commander-in-Chief, President George Washington, accompanied by Secretary of the Treasury and Revolutionary war veteran Alexander Hamilton. By the time the troops reached Pittsburgh, the rebellion had subsided, and western Pennsylvania was quickly pacified. This first use of the Militia Law of 1792 set a precedence for the use of the militia to "execute the laws of the union, (and) suppress insurrections". New Jersey was the only state to immediately fulfill their levy of troops to the exact number required by the President. This proud tradition of service to state and nation is carried on today by the New Jersey Army and Air National Guard.

The Whiskey Rebellion
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania — October 3, 1794
In September 1791 the western counties of Pennsylvania broke out in rebellion against a federal excise tax on the distillation of whiskey. After local and federal officials were attacked, President Washington and his advisors decided to send troops to pacify the region. It was further decided that militia troops, rather than regulars, would be sent. On August 14, 1792, under the provisions of the newly-enacted militia law, Secretary of War Henry Knox called upon the governors of Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania for 12,950 troops as a test of the President’s power to enforce the law. Numerous problems, both political and logistical, had to be overcome and by October, 1794 the militiamen were on the march. The New Jersey units marched from Trenton to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. There they were reviewed by their Commander-in-Chief, President George Washington, accompanied by Secretary of the Treasury and Revolutionary war veteran Alexander Hamilton. By the time the troops reached Pittsburgh, the rebellion had subsided, and western Pennsylvania was quickly pacified. This first use of the Militia Law of 1792 set a precedence for the use of the militia to “execute the laws of the union, (and) suppress insurrections”. New Jersey was the only state to immediately fulfill their levy of troops to the exact number required by the President. This proud tradition of service to state and nation is carried on today by the New Jersey Army and Air National Guard.